Archive for the ‘ Board Game Design ’ Category

Creating a Card Game: From Start to Finish

I’ve been pretty busy this month with two projects: Tragedia and Prehysteria. While you might recognize the name “Prehysteria” from an early blog post, this is an entirely new project that has nothing to do with that design document. This Prehysteria is a silly, dinosaur-themed competitive cooperative card game, and for today’s post, I’m going to take you through the process I’ve used, and am using, to create it.

 

Keep reading to learn more about creating card games!

Continue reading

Advertisements

Making Board Games Leads to Better Video Games

It is a game designer’s job to understand the inner workings of games, a skill that takes some practice to get the hang of. Throughout my college experience, I have found that game design is much different than I had imagined, and requires a lot of puzzle solving and critical thinking skills. One of the most significant aspects of designing a game is mechanics; game mechanics are what make the game interactive and enjoyable. So how does someone like myself, who is looking to make it into the industry, learn the secrets behind creating good mechanics? The answer is simple: make board games.

Continue reading

Speed Design Challenge: Ninja Love Massacre

For one of my last assignments in my Game Design Workshop class this semester, we had a speed design challenge. We came into class, split into groups of five, were given ridiculous names from a random name generator for video games, and were told to create a game using the name we were given and a pack of 100 different colored index cards. In the pack of index cards, there were 10 each of the colors pink, purple, green, blue, and yellow, and were given the opportunity to manipulate the cards in any physical way we chose. We were timed on completing different aspects of the challenge, while the goal was to create a fully playable game. The title of our game was Ninja Love Massacre.


Here is an approximate of how the time was to be used in class:
5 minutes to create a concept and rules
5 minutes to make a prototype
5 minutes to play test
5 minutes to revise
5 minutes to play test
5 minutes to revise
5 minutes to play test


Continue reading

Print and Play: Stop the Oil!

Today in class, I got to present a five minute demo for “Stop the Oil!” Despite my terrible explanation, the game seemed to be fairly popular among on my classmates, who had many questions regarding the game. I’ve also received a lot of interest from friends and family, so I’ve decided to make the game a “print and play” game! Keep reading to find out how you can get this game ready to play at home!


Continue reading

Board Game Design: Stop the Oil!

This semester, I’ve been enrolled in a pretty cool and interesting class: Game Design Workshop. The cool part about it? We make board games! It’s challenging and fun, and has most certainly been helping me better understand game design. So far in the class, I’ve created a total of four board games along with other classmates for most of them, but today I am going to focus on one in particular. “Stop the Oil!” is a game about cooperating with your teammates to clean wildlife and clean up the BP oil spill currently affecting the Gulf Coast.

My friend Nigel and I created a group together, and began thinking up game mechanics after I suggested making a game about cleaning up the BP oil spill. The requirements for the game included incorporating a fog of war element, cooperative game play over competitive, and some but not necessarily all of the components in a “piecepack.” The Professor provided us with the “piecepack,” which included twenty-four tiles with various numbers and suits, six-sided die, circular tokens, and player tokens. We decided to use the dice and the tiles for our game, and spent a day play testing to figure out how the game would work and what mechanics we wanted to implement. We also had to include an “alien” in the game, which was a rather loosely used term. Most other games in the class used a literal alien, though not all. Our “alien” was the BP employee, which was one player who would attempt to sabotage the other players in a secretive and cunning manner. After several play tests, we developed an interesting game play that seemed to work. We still needed to polish the game, fix a few mechanics, clarify the rules, and finish implementing the “alien’s” dastardly methods, when suddenly, Nigel got sick! I attempted to play test the game in class by myself, and my Professor actually came over, learned the rules, watched how the game play worked, and offered several very insightful suggestions. The core of the game play remained the same throughout most of the design, although the aesthetics were altered, with permission from the Professor of course, to better fit the game’s theme. Now that the game is nearing completion, I thought I would share!


Continue reading